Being a Digital Curator

how-to-strengthen-your-mind-learn-curiosity copy

I have a new role!
I am a curator. I have been curating on Pinterest for years and have only just realised there is a title to go with it. Digital curation sounds complex, but the abundance of online curating tools have “allowed anyone to become a curator” (Flintoff, Mellow & Pickett Clarke, 2014).  As a curator, I am collecting topic specific material, from a range of online sources and collating it in a fashion that is of interest to myself and others. There is great value for content gathering for educators and students and it is proving a powerful learning tool (Johnson, 2013).

BLOG-2 copy
Educators as Curators – Click image above

I am surrounded by digital information, so having content to curate is plentiful. The information overload, however, can become consuming. Determining what data is credible is an essential skill of a good curator and must be passed on to students for the benefit of their education and careers (Johnson, 2013).

I was recently introduced to Scoop.it; an online curating tool, which I used to create a teaching resource.  Johnson (2013) believes Scoop.it is very effective due to its visual impact, and as I built upon my resource, the visual appeal was instant and almost effortless. It was a rewarding process creating educational content that I am sure will engage my future audience.

The benefits for teachers using curating tools lie in the endless possibilities of creating such BLOG-3 copyresources that are content rich and will support both teaching and learning. Students can participate in this information gathering process by curating content for assignments and participating in collaborative research tasks.

Digital curation encompasses fundamental skills such as; researching, analysing, critical thinking and collaboration (Flintoff, Mellow & Pickett Clarke, 2014), it is only practical that students, as well as teachers, are well rehearsed in digital curation to set them up for the future.

So here’s to the curator in all of us!

BLOG-4

A short clip explaining content curation.

 

Google-Search-Tips
Want some tips on getting the most out of your Google searches? Click image above.

 

Pinterest-Curator
An informative Pinterest page on digital curation. Click image above.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

Daliulian. (2010). 40/4095512 [Image]. Retrieved from http://www.daliulian.net/imgs/image/40/4095512.jpg

Flintoff, K., Mellow, P., & Picket Clarke, K. (2014). Digital curation: opportunities for learning, teaching, research and professional development.  Retrieved from http://ctl.curtin.edu.au/events/conferences/tlf/tlf2014/refereed/flintoff.html

Johnson, L. (2013). Why Scoopit is becoming an indispensable learning tool.  Retrieved from http://www.teachthought.com/the-future-of-learning/trends-shifts/why-scoopit-is-becoming-an-indispensable-learning-tool/

Ollyy. (n.d.). Child with many question marks [Image]. Retrieved from http://www.shutterstock.com/pic-121813225/stock-photo-child-with-many-question-marks.html?irgwc=1&utm_campaign=Idee%20Inc.&tpl=77643-108110&utm_source=77643&utm_medium=Affiliate

Weisgerber, C. (2011). Curation steps [Image]. Retrieved from https://studentslearn.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/corinnew-curation-steps.jpg

White, N. (2012). Understanding content curation.  Retrieved from 0innovation.d20blogs.org/2012/07/07/understanding-content-curation/

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s